Sept. 29 , 2016

The Hidden Beauty of Pollination

by TED

It's the little things in life that really matters. Sometimes we loose sight of what keeps our planet and our economy thriving. It's those unforseen things that keep food on our table and keep the prices at the grocery store down.

Malcom Beck once spoke at a large conference about when he first started farming and he had just gotten back from the feed store with chemicals to spray on his potato bugs. His neighbor farmer asked him what he was doing. Malcom stated he was spraying the potato bugs. Malcolm was informed by his neighbor that he was spraying lady bugs that were eating his potato bugs. From that day Malcolm stopped using chemicals and became a well known organic farmer.

Would the world perish without our small pollinators? Before we revert to poisons take a look at how they will affect the costs of food at the grocery and may in fact affect what ends up on your plate. Could human life exist without them?

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Sept. 29 , 2016

Save The Monarchs - Laura Bush Oct. 2015

video by TPWD

Laura Bush speaks about the diminishing population of Texas monarch butterflies.

In October millions of butterflies migrate through Texas headed to Mexico for the winter. Along with bees and other important pollinators the numbers have plummeted. Insects pollinate many of the foods we eat, this is not good news for our farmers. Texas is on board in an attempt to save Texas's state insect, the monarch. Visit the Texas Parks and Wildlife' website to find out how you can help. http://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/texas_nature_trackers/monarch/

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Sept. 29 , 2016

Texas Horsemint (monardia citrodora)

video by TPWD

Texas horsemint or commonly known as lemon bee balm is easy to grow and will form large colonies. Lemon bee balm is a 1-2 ft. winter annual with lavender to pink tufted flower heads on an elongated spike on a multi stemmed base with pairs of leaves.

Horsemint/bee balm has a distinctive lemony scent when the leaves are crushed, bees and butterflies are attracted to this plant.

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Sept. 29 , 2016

Texas Beneficial Red Harvester Ant (Pornographer barb at us)

by TPWD

Harvester Ants are a highly beneficial and very interesting insect. The Texas Horned Lizard's survival is crucial to the Harvester ants population. Some areas of Texas the beneficial Harvester Ants are plentiful, however overall they are facing a difficult challenge to their survival. The imported red fire ant out competes the harvester ant for food, hence the reason for the decline of the beneficial and interesting harvester ants. We can help the harvester ant thrive by reducing the number of fire ants on our property.

Harvester ants are seed eaters, preferring grass seed. Planting native grasses close to any harvester ant mounds will provide long term food supplies for the ant. You can also feed harvester ant colonies if you are fortunate enough to have a harvester ant mound on your property. Do what you can to ensure the survival of this fascinating member of our ecosystem.

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Sept. 29 , 2016

Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma corutum)

by TPWD

The fierce looking lizard better known as the The Texas horned lizard or "horny toad" is currently listed as a threatened species in Texas (federal category C2),

A brownish lizard with 2 rows of fringed scales on each side of its' body. Most horned lizards have a and has 2 rows of fringed scales along each side of the body. On most Texas horned lizards, you can see a light line extending from it's head to it's middle back. The Texas horned lizard is the only horned Lizard to have a dark brown strip that radiates from the eyes to the top of the head.

Horned lizards live in arid and semiarid areas with sparse plant cover. Horned lizards dig for nesting, hibernation and insulating purposes, they are commonly found in loose and loamy soils.

The horned lizards range from the south-central United States to northern Mexico, throughout much of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and New Mexico.

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